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Mar. 10 - 2018

An international team of researches from the University of Oxford, United Kingdom, has discovered a “Supercolony” of more than 1.5 millions penguins in Danger Island (Islotes Peligro). As the researches have pointed out, this discovery refers to the penguin colonies on some of the other Danger Islands in the vicinity of Heroina that, when all combined, form an important mega-colony in the area. The researchers used a combination of drones, ground counts and satellite imagery to provide the first solid evidence of just how big these colonies really are. The 'hotspot' of penguin abundance is the aggregate, not on any one island.

Although researches had known for years that this area was populated by Adelie Penguins, the number of the population remained unknown. The discovery was published last week on “Scientific Reports” magazine, causing an overwhelming reaction among both travelers and other scientists.

One of the main reasons why this area is so populated is because of the environmental conditions there.

According to Tom Hart, Professor at Oxford University, “This is the biggest colony discovered recently. It is a huge number of penguins. The weirdest, most surprising and incredible thing is that, in this day and age, something so big can go unseen. They have been missed because they are hard to get to. They really have been overlooked. If you were to convey it to someone who had not seen them, it was like the biggest crowd you could ever see made up of hundreds of thousands of penguins.”

When referring to the significance of the discovery, Hart stated : “I think people have got used to knowing where things are, so they stop looking."
“They have been there all along. This is not new to the penguins - they are quite happy living their lives out there. This is new to us and it is just a fact that we have overlooked them.”

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