W. W. W: WHALES WHEN AND WHERE

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Sep. 20 - 2019
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The most in-depth exploration of the Antarctic Peninsula time is when the sun is up for 24-hours a day during the austral summer, mostly in February, making it perfect for whale-watching. Which species you see depends on the weather, the ice, the cruise you take and if whales are in the mood to be seen, of course. Most frequent destinations to spot them apart from the Antarctic Peninsula are the Ross Sea, Falkland Islands and South Georgia.


Credits: Lorena Berutti - Paradise Harbor - March 4th 2019.-

Right after traversing the waters of the Drake Passage, you reach neighbouring islands of the Antarctic Peninsula. The first sight of land is likely to be the whereabouts of South Shetland Islands.

Credits: Lorena Berutti - Paradise Harbor - March 4th 2019.-

At this point, the navigation aims for the most scenic bays and channels of the Peninsula with stops at penguin rookeries, seal wallows, bird colonies and whale feeding areas, as well as sites of historic and scientific interest.


Credits: Lorena Berutti - Humpback Whales Sleeping - Yalour Islands - March 19th 2019.-

Heading south across the Bransfield Strait, you'll see plentiful icebergs floating by and be fixated on the surface of the ocean as curious whales spout and breach before your eyes. On our Quest to the Antarctic Circle exploration we aim to make landfall on Wilhelmina Bay where we often encounter large pods of Humpback Whales as we cruise in the Zodiacs.


Credits: Lorena Berutti - Paradise Harbor - March 4th 2019.-

These have been seen hobnobbing with different species of cetaceans and are known to approach boats.


At this time of year it is also very likely to encounter Finn whales, which are the fastest of all the giant whales; and Sei whales (pronounced “say”) that are relatively shallow divers making them easier to spot than some of the deeper-diving species.


Contact us and learn the details for whale-watching season and all of the best deals we’ve got for these expeditions in Antarctica Travels contact@antarcticatravels.com




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